There are several Jewish traditions surrounding the death loved ones. We say the mourner’s kaddish. It is not a mournful dirge, but rather praise to the Giver of Life. Mourners tear their garments, expressing their grief, and put soil on the casket after it is lowered into the ground, putting closure on the reality before us. For seven days we sit shiva (seven) mourning and remembering those who died. During the seven days that we sit shiva friends visit with us to console us and help us remember what our loved one meant to us. On the anniversary of the death of our loved one we light the Yahrzeit (year time) candle to remember the person who died. The Yizkor (remembrance) service is the time when we remember our loved one.

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The Western Wall is the western portion of the retaining wall of the Temple Mount where the Temple stood. The Hebrew for Western Wall is ha-Kotel ha-Ma'aravi, although it is usually called simply ha-Kotel, the Wall. Over the years, since the Temple was destroyed in 70 CE, we have had intermittent access to the Wall depending on who was controlling Jerusalem at the time.

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Even though we have modernized we still hold some sacred old traditions dear amongst the Jewish community. Jewish wedding traditions are one such old tradition that is still held to this day. Depending on the conservativeness of the Rabbi Jewish weddings can be conducted under firm Jewish law traditions, or if done by a reformed Rabbi a more modernize take on the Jewish wedding can be done. One thing that stays the same though is the Jewish wedding rings. They are the heart and soul of a Jewish wedding.

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